Why do you buy art? We asked our supporters and friends and gathered these varied and interesting responses. From 'Setting the Mood', to 'Gifts of Love', to collecting for the sheer pleasure of it. The reasons are diverse, but at the core is a love of art. What reasons do you have for buying art?
Artwork by William Breen

Artwork by William Breen

Artwork by Caroline Rannersberger

Artwork by Caroline Rannersberger

Artwork by Kathryn Ryan

1

TAKE ME AWAY

One of the most enduring qualities of art is its power to transport the viewer to another time and place. Looking at a picture can take you to a pristine wilderness, a fantastical dreamscape or into the outer reaches of the cosmos. Like portals into other people’s world, lives and minds, art affords us a unique opportunity to step outside of our familiar surroundings and into new worlds. Art helps increase our capacity for empathy and understanding of other cultural practices, as well as a deepening our own sense of cultural identity.

“Basically I love paintings that resonate with my experience of this planet ... and much prefer to get lost in these in those rare meditative moments.” Angus Barnes, Supporter & Friend of FLG


“In his 1958 book, La Poétique de l’Espace, Gaston Bachelard wrote about the lived experience of architecture: the accumulated moments of joy which turn a house into a home, for example. He highlighted the importance of daydreaming in this process when he observed that the ‘daydream transports the dreamer outside the immediate world to a world that bears the mark of infinity’. In our home, the artwork on our walls and sculptures standing in our lounge have become our daydreaming devices. They raise our thoughts above everyday life and open us up to a world full of poetry, beauty and compassion. They have helped us build a home and in doing so, have helped us create a happy life.” Leonard Vary, Supporter & Friend of FLG


“I first came across William Breen at an exhibition at Flinders Lane Gallery in the early 2000s. They were amazing seascapes that seemed to be 80% sky. I know I like a piece of art when time stops for me, and I get a special sense of stillness and joy. That’s what William Breen does for me.

At that point I set my mind on owning one of his pieces - and about 10 years later I achieved that ambition! A beautiful landscape of country Victoria, with depth, stillness and his usual skill with clouds. It sits in my living room now, and when I stop to look at it, I am calmed.
I love it.

Now art is part of my life, and my wife & I chip away at following what is happening in art, attending events when we can, following Flinders Lane Gallery remotely from Fremantle, and buying small pieces to add to our collection; usually associated with birthdays or special occasions. Purchases are partly driven by research, but also about finding that moment of stillness and joy. And we love it. It’s still about love.” Dave Coggin, Supporter & Friend of FLG

Artwork by William Breen

Artwork by Kathryn Ryan

Artwork by Caroline Rannersberger

Artwork by William Breen

Artwork by Caroline Rannersberger

2

EXPRESS YOURSELF

Consciously or unconsciously the objects you gather in your space speak volumes about who you are and what you value. Whether you’re a lover of the outdoors, have a great sense of humour or like life to be in a state of order, including original artworks in your environment is a perfect way to express your individuality, interests and aspirations.

“Art challenges you, moves you, scares you and takes you out of your comfort zone. It gives you the ability to appreciate people with a skill set beyond anything you have seen before. It makes you wonder how something that appears to be so simple, can be so complex and vice versa.

You walk into a room and your breath gets taken away. You walk into a room and feel like you are going to cry. You walk into a room and laugh uncontrollably. You walk into a room and smile.

This is why we buy art.” Brad & Holly, Supporters & Friends of FLG


“The works that I take home (albeit occasionally), are the ones that resonate in some way with my conscious or sub-conscious – they are often darker than the personality I present to others but say something about my lurking fears, thrills and desires. So while they are born from the imagination of another, these works feel as though they are somehow spun from my own silent dreams. In my waking hours they beckon me to contemplate and admire them – my mood, as fitful as Melbourne seasons, will determine how I experience them each day. Bringing art into my home may feel like a selfish pursuit, but I hope that the rewards are also felt by the artists who, with my modest sponsorship, can continue to develop their ideas and their practice for all of the reasons that our society needs them.” Bridie Mackay, Supporter & Friend of FLG

Artwork –William Breen

Artworks by Rebecca Hastings, Stuart Robertson, Geoff Dixon, Lynn Sandri

Artwork –William Breen

Artworks by Rebecca Hastings, Stuart Robertson, Geoff Dixon, Lynn Sandri

3

SET THE MOOD

We’re all familiar with the experience of walking into a room and instantly feeling the effects of its atmosphere. Our brains are hardwired to emotionally respond to the visual stimuli of colour, form and light and the mood you create in your home or office has a powerful influence on the way you and others think, communicate and behave. The presence of artworks within a space has the potential to reinforce positive feelings of relaxation, curiosity, sensuality or confidence.

“We appreciate many styles of painting at multiple levels, but when it comes to selecting works for our home we have an eye to creating an environment, as well as finding works that will stay fresh to us over a longer period. We are drawn to works that have beauty and depth, that are evocative, contemplative and sometimes mysterious. The use of the words beauty and art in the same sentence is unfashionable, but we find that true beauty (as opposed to merely pretty or decorative) in one’s home nurtures the soul.” Ian & John, Supporters & Friends of FLG


“We love to buy art that excites or soothes us, that reminds us of places we have been or would like to go to and provokes positive emotional responses such as joy and contentment. We are especially stimulated by particular colours and designs in paintings, photographs and sculpture. As I walk through our houses I take in every piece of art numerous times every day and always feel grateful to share life’s journey with each piece. I have never grown tired of admiring any piece of art I have ever bought, no matter what age or stage I was at when I bought it.” Jane & Bruce, Supporters & Friends of FLG

Artwork by Naomi White, interior consultant Doherty Design, Photo by Tom Ross

Artwork by Susan Baird, interior consultant Virginia Macleod

Artwork by Naomi White, interior consultant Doherty Design, Photo by Tom Ross

Artwork by Susan Baird, interior consultant Virginia Macleod

4

WHAT MEMORIES ARE MADE OF

Possessing a memento of a time or place in your life is a significant and grounding experience. It might be something as simple as a stone collected on a special beach walk or a precious object gifted by a loved one. Purchasing an artwork creates a similar emotional link between a time and place. You might purchase an artwork after receiving a job promotion, while on a wonderful holiday or to mark a new phase in life. Living with an artwork which signifies a specific period in your life creates a constant, affirmative reminder of that memory, place, person or achievement.

“Between the wars my father studied ceramics at the then East Sydney Tech, and that may have been where my interest started. Shortly after I finished undergraduate study he gave me an Eric Take Christmas Card and a Nobertine von Bresslern Roth linocut. Not long after that I met Alan Oldfield and that sparked an interest in going to galleries and starting to collect art. That has gone on for over 30 years. Now there is no wall or floor space left. I cannot claim to have an educated eye for art, and my purchasing is mostly a “gut” thing; that is how a painting strikes me on first seeing it. I don’t regret having acquired any of the works I own, and generally, they continue to engage me whenever I look at them. Particularly this is so with works like Alan Oldfield, Earle Backen and David Eastwood who became friends.” David Galbraith, Supporter & Friend of FLG

Artwork by Alma Nungurrayi Granites hanging in the home of ex-pat on the island of Jost Van Dyke in the BVI.

Artwork by Caroline Rannersberger

Artwork by Alma Nungurrayi Granites hanging in the home of ex-pat on the island of Jost Van Dyke in the BVI.

Artwork by Caroline Rannersberger

5

Artwork by Dion Horstmans

NURTURING THE INNER ARTIST

Creating an environment that is stimulating, inspiring and dynamic can be beneficial for both families and businesses alike. Children thrive in spaces that encourage a sense of exploration and visual expression. Within the work environment, waiting areas and work spaces also benefit from an atmosphere of vibrancy, encouraging creative, new ways of thinking.

“When I asked my 9-year-old boy why people should think about buying art he responded ‘It fills your house with happiness!’” Claire Harris, Director FLG


“The design studio needs to be an inspiring space. Graphic design can be a fast-paced industry, demanding a different set of design skills and an innovative approach on each new project. This is why inspiration is sourced from everywhere and anywhere. A studio filled with music, design and art, plays a big part on fulfilling that much-needed creative environment.” Samantha Kahl, Director OÙ Design

Artwork back wall by Alexander McKenzie, front wall Rebecca Hastings

Artwork by Zac Koukoravas, Courtesy of Full of Grace Interiors

Artwork by Dion Horstmans

6

COLOUR YOUR WORLD

Responding to colour is such a personal experience. While some people love living with a riot of candy stripes, others might prefer a world of cool neutrals. From a design perspective the achievement of a harmonious relationship between soft furnishings, wall colours and finishes can be mediated through the selection of complementary artworks. Bright, colourful spaces can benefit from a soothing palette, while sometimes the best thing for a minimalist interior is a good splash of bold colour.

Artwork by Agneta Ekholm, courtesy Studio Griffiths, Photo Sharyn Cairns “Art is a very personal choice and helps to create soul in a home – it should reflect your personality which is what I always try to achieve with any project. The colour of an artwork can influence the look of the whole room - light and bright colours create a casual feel and darker colours will create a formal and moody tone. Bold coloured artwork in a monochrome background enhances rich colours and allows the artworks to stand out.” Gillianne Griffiths, Studio Griffiths.

Artwork by Terri Brooks image courtesy of Doherty Design & Inarc Architects. Derek Stalwell photography

Artwork by Jo Davenport, Greg Natale HQ, photo by Anson Smart

“I am immediately drawn to colour, rhythm, pattern, a sense of place, a sense of humour, amongst other things - connecting intensely with the work. I love being surrounded by art - it gives me a comfort and a joy and memories of important times in my life as well as reminding me of the artists themselves. The colours and images and mark making fill me with a sense of joy.” Marianne, Friend of FLG

Artwork by Agneta Ekholm, courtesy Studio Grif ths, Photo Sharyn Cairns

7

FLG team and artists

THE ARTIST IS PRESENT

Behind every artwork sits an individual striving to achieve great things in their career. By supporting the practices of living artists you become an important link within the artistic process. From the makers of fine quality arts materials, the art teachers, fine art publishers and journalists, through to the gallery in which you might have seen the artwork hanging, each purchase supports the creative community.

“What I’ve naturally discovered is, I love being involved in the art world, even in a small way. As I get to know the artists I realise that the work I purchase may just be the sale that keeps them going as artist in the incredibly hard economic path they have taken. I’m always hard on myself for not being able to ‘help’ more.” Mike Cole, Supporter & Friend of FLG

Artwork by Jo Davenport, Greg Natale HQ, photo by Anson Smart

8

POLISHING THINGS OFF

While minimalism is currently enjoying a resurgence within the world of interior trends, a room totally devoid of artworks can often feel a bit too utilitarian. By choosing artworks that you love, but which also complement the design of your space, you can achieve a sleek, contemporary look that also feels like it is part of a harmonious, consistent whole.

“Buying original artworks is such a special experience and so rewarding.

We have purchased original artworks from FLG for our clients, and I’ve also purchased them for my own home. As an Interior Design studio, we encourage our clients to purchase original pieces, and support Australian artists as much as possible.

Last year we purchased a sculptural piece of Hannah Quinlivan’s for a client’s entry hallway, and it was such a treat to see her work interpreted in a performance piece last month, where her sculptural artwork was draped around the body of an opera singer Louise Keast. It was a cold rainy night in Melbourne, and the combination of Hannah’s artwork and the haunting voice of Louise was really beautiful. An experience I will remember for a long time.” Mardi Doherty, Doherty Design Studio

Artwork by Hannah Quinlivan - image courtesy of Doherty Design & Inarc Architects. Derek Stalwell photograph

Artwork by Naomi White, image courtesy of Too Heaven Design

Artwork by Hannah Quinlivan, image courtesy of Decor Project and Lisa Zhu photography

Artwork by Kathrin Longhurst

Artwork by Michael Gromm at home in Singapore

9

THE ART OF CONVERSATION

Every picture tells a thousand words and what better way to break the ice than by answering questions about the works hanging on your walls. Or perhaps you would like visitors to know something about you without having to be explicit. The artworks that hang in your dining area or board room give visitors an opportunity to understand who you are, where you have been and what you’re passionate about.

“The art in my home plays a number of roles - it starts by building an individual aesthetic and a cosy sense of homeliness. It reflects the interests of my family. It triggers endless conversations with guests; some of the works are challenging, and openly invite thoughtful discussions. Some works are a bridge to a time or place, and cause me to reflect on histories and relationships in my life and the changes that have occurred since. Some works were purchased in the excitement of discovering an emerging talent, and while I didn’t buy them as an investment, I have to admit that it’s fun to watch their value increase.” Gareth Colliton, Friend of FLG

10

ART AS INVESTMENT

Through the purchase of an artwork, not only are you supporting the economic vitality of the arts community, you are also creating a nest egg of your own future wealth. While the prospect of purchasing an artwork purely for its market value is not the best way to accumulate a collection, being savvy to the career highlights and exhibition history of an artist can put you in good stead to making sure that piece you fall in love with will become a treasure for generations to come.

Artworks by Dion Horstmans & Waldemar Kolbusz

Artwork by Jo Davenport

11

MIXING WORK AND PLEASURE

All of the positive benefits of living with artworks that we’ve outlined above also apply to the office environment. Carefully selected paintings, prints and sculptures have the potential to benefit both your staff and visitors to your business. A restrained collection of pieces hung in a foyer can set the tone and first impression of your businesses, help clients feel at ease and focus staff as they move through their workspace. Hung in board rooms and communal office areas, artworks can help staff to think creatively, feel inspired and calm, by degrees helping generate higher productivity levels overall. Because art connects with us on an emotional level, the selection of corporate artworks often requires some research and curatorial advice. Galleries will often engage business owners in a series of discussions to determine what artworks would best complement the character and intention of their company.

“I’ve been lucky enough to be surrounded by beautiful art all my life. I find artwork in the environments in which I live, work and play incredibly uplifting and energising. I can’t imagine what it would be like not living with art as an integral part of my life.” Carol Schwartz AM, Supporter & Friend of FLG


“For a creative work place like ours art helps extend the discussion beyond just architecture alone. Our homes can lack a certain soul without art. It’s here that a house becomes a home (corny but very true). The place of work is no different. The art collection can be cohesive or can deliberately clash to encourage a question or at least a reaction from staff and clients.” Pleysier Perkins Architects, Supporters & Friends of FLG


  • Artworks by Chloe Vallance, Raymond Carter (on book shelves), Camille Hannah, Marc Renshaw, Dion Horstmans (wall sculptures) image courtesy of Pleysier Perkins


  • Artwork by Jo Davenport, image courtesy of Loanbrix

Suite of Warlukurlangu Artists paintings at 101 Collins.

Artwork by Dion Horstmans at Small Medium Large

LOOK AND LEARN

12

LOOK AND LEARN

Sometimes the best thing you can do with an artwork is to just sit down in front of it. You might not own an Escher or a Picasso, but looking at an artwork can have the same mental benefit as other forms of stimulating brain training like crosswords or spatial puzzles. Thinking conceptually, abstractly, and emotionally can help reduce stress, aid sleep and stave of illnesses such as Alzheimer’s, dementia, anxiety or depression. What a wonderful reason to sit and take in the beauty of an artwork. Art is capable of broadening our understanding of other people & cultures, increase our knowledge of this complex world and help us shape and express our identity.


  • Artwork by Zac Koukoravas


  • Artwork by Agneta Ekholm


  • Artwork by Theo Faye Nangala Hudson

Artwork by Josh Robbins, Clarendon Lawyers workplace

Pauline Napangardi Gallagher in a law office Melbourne.

Artwork by Dion Horstmans & Piers Buxton

Artworks by Andrew Christofides (hall), Jacob Leary (hall), Paul Snell (hall), Lara Merret (lounge), Gregor Kregar (lounge). Image courtesy of Justin Arts House Museum, Apartment Detail. Photo: Andrew Wuttke

13

THE PLEASURE OF COLLECTING

There is nothing quite like seeing your collection grow. Not only do each of them speak to something unique and timely about your life, the act of hunting for a new work has the potential of taking you on a pleasurable journey through galleries, artists’ studios, fairs, markets and action houses. You can follow the artists’ journeys along their career paths knowing you have been a part of their support network. As each newly acquired treasure enters your space a new story unfolds.

“Living with art is a totally enriching experience full of beauty, challenge, insight and wonder. There are few material possessions that keep on giving throughout your lifetime the way art does. You don’t need to be an expert or an authority to enjoy art, just the enthusiasm to take the plunge. The reward is endless.” Charles Justin, Supporter & Friend of FLG


“As the collection grows, curated or as an informal assemblage, a layered narrative develops between the pieces which enriches the overall experience of having a collection.

The solidity and weight of the Greg Johns swivelling steel mandala has a balance, softness and movement that resonates with the dreamlike, diaphanous quality of Agneta Ekholm’s work above. composure and balance.

Zac Koukoravas dark compressed two dimensional study encapsulates the characteristics and qualities of the various sculpture pieces strategically placed around the home.

The ordered black wire sculpture of Dion Horstmans and the folded steel sculpture in sunburnt ochre by Piers Buxton are in the garden terrace.” AdeB, Supporter & Friend of FLG

Artwork by Zac Koukoravas

Artworks by Greg Johns and Agneta Ekholm

14

THE ART OF GIVING

Giving a loved one an original artwork – to commemorate a wedding, a significant birthday or perhaps just because – is such a distinct way of telling them how special they are to you. Art is intimate and enduring, and to select something you know they will love for years to come is a rewarding feeling. Maybe they have been following the career of a particular artist for some time, or you think the work reflects a theme or subject you know will resonate with them. These are great places to start when looking for an artwork for someone. It can, however, be a tricky process if you’re not entirely certain they will like the work. Make a time to go to some galleries with them first, watch what they respond to, talk to them about what they like about a particular artwork or artist’s practice before taking the plunge. And if you’re still not sure, a gift certificate can be a good option too.

“My first art purchase was really about love. I had met a girl and fallen in love, and after a whirlwind long distance romance I moved to Melbourne to be with her. We had bonded over Michael Leunig poems, as you did in the late 90s, and a week after my arrival in Melbourne she presented me with a birthday present - a beautiful, fun, large Leunig print called “Leap of Faith”.

That was the beginning of my art journey. We regularly visited galleries in Melbourne and checked out what was happening. I’d sometimes spend my lunchtime sitting in one of the main galleries of the newly-opened NGV. We slowly started buying more pieces, mainly small, affordable prints, and have since been lucky enough to buy more one-off original pieces.” Dave Coggin, Supporter & Friend of FLG


“Like those of us who like to surround themselves with music, living with beautiful art feels like such a gorgeous indulgence - a really personal thing. Some have an investor’s eye; some just love what they love. That’s me really. I only give art to people I know really well. Partly because I can visit it and live with it vicariously!” Anne Austin, Supporter & Friend of FLG

“I commissioned an original work by the wonderful watercolourist and print maker, the late Juli Haas, for my sister’s 40th birthday surprise party. It was a surprise and all the family contributed to the gift. The look on my sister’s face as she opened her special present was heart-warming. The artwork now features in pride of place in her home.” Claire Harris, Director FLG

15

ART
AND SOUL

Artwork by Caroline Rannersberger Just like the clothes and jewellery with which we choose to adorn ourselves, or those well-loved books sitting on our bookshelves, artworks also serve as an affirming reminder of who we are and what is important to us. Perhaps an image reminds you of the street you grew up in, a special holiday location, or an attitude or cultural position with which you are aligned. Having images within your space that remind you of where you come from, or what is important to you, can enhance your sense of well-being and add to a feeling of overall happiness.

‘’They take me to a specific time and place and as such, they are a very personal and comforting record and proof of ‘life’ and I wouldn’t be without them.’’ Graeme Bell, Supporter & Friend of FLG

Artwork by William Breen, a special commissioned painting of the client’s childhood street in Melbourne.

Artwork by Caroline Rannersberger

16

MY PICTURES OF YOU

Our smart phones have really become small, mobile photo albums, housing thumbnail after thumbnail of loved ones and friends. Sometimes we print them up and frame them, but often we don’t. While formal portraiture might seem like a thing of the past – think dusty corridors and stuffy ancestors – they are actually still very relevant to today’s world. Rather than printing up a happy snap, or booking in an intimidating family photo shoot with a glitzy studio who will ultimately own all your images, the commissioning of a painted portrait is a far more intimate and personal memory. Through a few informal sittings a perceptive artist will capture the true inner beauty of your loved one.

Artist Claire Bridge with a commissioned portrait.

Josh Robbins commission piece

17

HOME IS WHERE THE ART IS

How lovely it is to come home - to shut the door, kick of the shoes and slip back into your own private world. The outside buzz fades away and the narrative of our own life is reinstated. It is within these domestic settings that we are most often at ease, where we house and keep safe those things most dear to us, where we sleep and dream and reflect. In these environments artworks can operate like talismans, strengthening and focusing our passions and aspirations. They advocate our pleasures, daydreams, plans and relationships. Like old friends or a favourite piece of music, artworks energise a room and transform it from four walls into a haven.

this is it

this is the place

said the purple dove

to his purple love

come hither now

and share a feather now

forever now

we can rest here

this is the place to nest dear

with our familiar near

our happy hunting’s here

we will build and build and build

until it’s filled and filled and filled

with grass and fruit and down

and we’re warm from hearth and flume and gown

and our chesty thump, thump, thump is our

bestie sound, sound, sound.

Josh Robbins commission piece

©FlindersLaneGallery2017

Artwork by Kathryn Ryan

1

TAKE ME AWAY

One of the most enduring qualities of art is its power to transport the viewer to another time and place.Looking at a picture can take you to a pristine wilderness, a fantastical dreamscape or into the outer reaches of the cosmos. Like portals into other people’s world, lives and minds, art affords us a unique opportunity to step outside of our familiar surroundings and into new worlds. Art helps increase our capacity for empathy and understanding of other cultural practices, as well as a deepening our own sense of cultural identity.

“Basically I love paintings that resonate with my experience of this planet ... and much prefer to get lost in these in those rare meditative moments” Angus Barnes, Supporter & Friend of FLG


“In his 1958 book, La Poétique de l’Espace, Gaston Bachelard wrote about the lived experience of architecture: the accumulated moments of joy which turn a house into a home, for example. He highlighted the importance of daydreaming in this process when he observed that the “daydream transports the dreamer outside the immediate world to a world that bears the mark of infinity.” In our home, the artwork on our walls and sculptures standing in our lounge have become our daydreaming devices. They raise our thoughts above everyday life and open us up to a world full of poetry, beauty and compassion. They have helped us build a home and in doing so, have helped us create a happy life.” Leonard Vary, Supporter & Friend of FLG


“I first came across William Breen at an exhibition at Flinders Lane Gallery in the early-2000s. They were amazing seascape that seemed to be 80% sky. I know I like a piece of art when time stops for me, and I get a special sense of stillness and joy. That’s what William Breen does for me.

At that point I set my mind on owning one of his pieces - and about 10 years later I achieved that ambition! A beautiful landscape of country Victoria, with depth, stillness and his usual skill with clouds. It sits in my living room now, and when I stop to look at it, I am calmed.I love it.

Now art is part of my life, and me and my wife chip away at following what is happening in art, attending events when we can, following Flinders Lane Gallery remotely from Fremantle, and buying small pieces to add to our collection; usually associated with birthdays or special occasions. Purchases are partly driven by research, but also about finding that moment of stillness and joy. And we love it. It’s still about love.” Dave Coggin, Supporter & Friend of FLG

Artwork by William Breen

Artwork by William Breen

Artwork by Susan Baird, interior consultant Virginia Macleod

Artwork by Caroline Rannersberger

2

EXPRESS YOURSELF

Consciously or unconsciously the objects you gather in your space speak volumes about who you are and what you value. Whether you’re a lover of the outdoors, have a great sense of humour or like life to be in a state of order, including original artworks in your environment is a perfect way to express your individuality, interests and aspirations

“Art challenges you, moves you, scares you and takes you out of your comfort zone. It gives you the ability to appreciate people with a skill set beyond anything you have seen before. It makes you wonder how something that appears to be so simple, can be so complex and vice versa.

You walk into a room and your breath gets taken away. You walk into a room and feel like you are going to cry. You walk into a room and laugh uncontrollably. You walk into a room and smile. This is why we buy art.” Brad & Holly, Supporters & Friends of FLG

 

Artwork –William Breen

“The works that I take home (albeit occasionally), are the ones that resonate in some way with my conscious or sub-conscious – they are often darker than the personality I present to others but say something about my lurking fears, thrills and desires. So while they are born from the imagination of another, these works feel as though they are somehow spun from my own silent dreams. In my waking hours they beckon me to contemplate and admire them – my mood, as fitful as Melbourne seasons, will determine how I experience them each day. Bringing art into my home may feel like a selfish pursuit, but I hope that the rewards are also felt by the artists who, with my modest sponsorship, can continue to develop their ideas and their practice for all of the reasons that our society needs them.” Bridie Mackay, Friend of FLG

 

Artworks by Rebecca Hastings, Stuart Robertson, Geoff Dixon, Lynn Sandri

3

SET THE MOOD

We’re all familiar with the experience of walking into a room and instantly feeling the effects of its atmosphere. Our brains are hardwired to emotionally respond to the visual stimuli of colour, form and light and the mood you create in your home or office has a powerful influence of the way you and others think, communicate and behave. The presence of artworks within a space has the potential to reinforce positive feelings of relaxation, curiosity, sensuality or confidence.

“We appreciate many styles of painting at multiple levels, but when it comes to selecting works for our home we have an eye to creating an environment, as well as finding works that will stay fresh to us over a longer period. We are drawn to works that have beauty and depth, that are evocative, contemplative and sometimes mysterious. The use of the words beauty and art in the same sentence is unfashionable, but we find that true beauty (as opposed to merely pretty or decorative) in one’s home nurtures the soul.” Ian & John, Supporters & Friends of FLG


“We love to buy art that excites or soothes us, that reminds us of places we have been or would like to go to and provokes positive emotional responses such as joy and contentment. We are especially stimulated by particular colours and designs in paintings, photographs and sculpture. As I walk through our houses I take in every piece of art numerous times every day and always feel grateful to share life’s journey with each piece. I have never grown tired of admiring any piece of art I have ever bought, no matter what age or stage I was at when I bought it.” Jane & Bruce, Supporters & Friends of FLG

Artwork by Naomi White, interior consultant Doherty Design, Photo by Tom Ross

4

WHAT MEMORIES ARE MADE OF

Possessing a memento of a time or place in your life is a significant and grounding experience. It might be something as simple as a stone collected on a special beach walk or a precious object gifted by a loved one. Purchasing an artwork creates a similar emotional link between a time and place. You might purchase an artwork after receiving a job promotion, while on a wonderful holiday or to mark a new phase in life. Living with an artwork which signifies a specific period in your life creates a constant, affirmative reminder of that memory, place, person or achievement.

Artwork by Alma Nungurrayi Granites hanging in the home of ex-pat on the island of Jost Van Dyke in the BVI.

“Between the wars my father studied ceramics at the then East Sydney Tech, and that may have been where my interest started. Shortly after I finished undergraduate study he gave me an Eric Take Christmas Card and a Nobertine von Bresslern Roth linocut. Not long after that I met Alan Oldfield and that sparked an interest in going to galleries and starting to collect art. That has gone on for over 30 years. Now there is no wall or floor space left. I cannot claim to have an educated eye for art, and my purchasing is mostly a “gut” thing; that is how a painting strikes me on first seeing it. I don’t regret having acquired any of the works I own, and generally, they continue to engage me whenever I look at them. Particularly this is so with works like Alan Oldfield, Earle Backen and David Eastwood who became friends.” David Galbraith, Supporter & Friend of FLG

NURTURING THE INNER ARTIST

5

Creating an environment that is stimulating, inspiring and dynamic can be beneficial for both families and businesses alike. Children thrive in spaces that encourage a sense of exploration and visual expression. Within the work environment, waiting areas and work spaces also benefit from an atmosphere of vibrancy, encouraging creative, new ways of thinking.

Artwork by Dion Horstmans

 

“When I asked my 9-year-old boy why people should think about buying art he responded ‘It fills your house with happiness!’” Claire Harris, Director FLG


“The design studio needs to be an inspiring space. Graphic design can be a fast-paced industry, demanding a different set of design skills and an innovative approach on each new project. This is why inspiration is sourced from everywhere and anywhere. A studio filled with music, design and art, plays a big part on fulfilling that much-needed creative environment.” Samantha Kahl, Director OÙ Design

 

Artwork back wall by Alexander McKenzie, front wall Rebecca Hastings

Artwork by Zac Koukoravas, Courtesy of Full of Grace Interiors

6

COLOUR YOUR WORLD

Responding to colour is such a personal experience. While some people love living with a riot of candy stripes, others might prefer a world of cool neutrals. From a design perspective the achievement of a harmonious relationship between soft furnishings, wall colours and finishes can be mediated through the selection of complementary artworks. Bright, colourful spaces can benefit from a soothing palette, while sometimes the best thing for a minimalist interior is a good splash of bold colour.

Artwork by Agneta Ekholm,
courtesy Studio Griffiths, Photo Sharyn Cairns

Art is a very personal choice and helps to create soul in a home – it should reflect your personality which is what I always try to achieve with any project. The colour of an artwork can influence the look of the whole room - light and bright colours create a casual feel and darker colours will create a formal and moody tone. Bold colour artwork in a monochrome background enhances rich colours and allows the artworks to stand out. Gillianne Griffiths, Studio Griffiths.

Artwork by Jo Davenport, Greg Natale HQ, photo by Anson Smart

7

THE ARTIST IS PRESENT

Behind every artwork sits an individual striving to achieve great things in their career. By supporting the practices of living artists you become an important link within the artistic process. From the makers of fine quality arts materials, the art teachers, fine art publishers and journalists, through to the gallery in which you might have seen the artwork hanging, each purchase supports the creative community.

“What I’ve naturally discovered is, I love being involved in the art world, even in a small way. As I get to know the artists I realise that the work I purchase may just be the sale that keeps them going as artist in the incredibly hard economic path they have taken. I’m always hard on myself for not being able to ‘help’ more.” Mike Cole, Supporter & Friend of FLG

FLG team and artists

8

POLISHING
THINGS OFF

While minimalism is currently enjoying a resurgence within the world of interior trends, a room totally devoid of artworks can often feel a bit too utilitarian. By choosing artworks that you love, but which also complement the design of your space, you can achieve a sleek, contemporary look that also feels like it is part of a harmonious, consistent whole.

Artwork by Hannah Quinlivan - image courtesy of Doherty Design & Inarc Architects. Derek Stalwell photograph

“Buying original artworks is such a special experience and so rewarding. We have purchased original artworks from FLG for our clients, and I’ve also purchased them for my own home. As an Interior Design studio, we encourage our clients to purchase original pieces, and support Australian artists as much as possible

Last year we purchased a sculptural piece of Hannah Quinlivan’s for a client’s entry hallway, and it was such a treat to see her work interpreted in a performance piece last month, where her sculptural artwork was draped around the body of an opera singer Louise Keast. It was a cold rainy night in Melbourne, and the combination of Hannah’s artwork and the haunting voice of Louise was really beautiful. An experience I will remember for a long time.” Mardi Doherty, Doherty Design Studio

9

THE ART OF CONVERSATION

Every picture tells a thousand words and what better way to break the ice than by answering questions about the works hanging on your walls. Or perhaps you would like visitors to know something about you without having to be explicit. The artworks that hang in your dining area or board room give visitors an opportunity to understand who you are, where you have been and what you’re passionate about.

Artwork by Kathrin Longhurst

Artwork by Naomi White, image courtesy of Too Heaven Design

“The art in my home plays a number of roles - it starts by building an individual aesthetic and a cosy sense of homeliness. It reflects the interests of my family. It triggers endless conversations with guests; some of the works are challenging, and openly invite thoughtful discussions. Some works are a bridge to a time or place, and cause me to reflect on histories and relationships in my life and the changes that have occurred since. Some works were purchased in the excitement of discovering an emerging talent, and while I didn’t buy them as an investment, I have to admit that it’s fun to watch their value increase.” Gareth Colliton, Friend of FLG

ART AS INVESTMENT

10

Through the purchase of an artwork, not only are you supporting the economic vitality of the arts community, you are also creating a nest egg of your own future wealth. While the prospect of purchasing an artwork purely for its market value is not the best way to accumulate a collection, being savvy to the career highlights and exhibition history of an artist can put you in good stead to making sure that piece you fall in love with will become a treasure for generations to come.

Artwork by Jo Davenport

Artworks by Dion Horstmans & Waldemar Kolbusz

MIXING WORK AND PLEASURE

11

All of the positive benefits of living with artworks that we’ve outlined above also apply to the office environment. Carefully selected paintings, prints and sculptures have the potential to benefit both your staff and visitors to your business. A restrained collection of pieces hung in a foyer can set the tone and first impression of your businesses, help clients feel at ease and focus staff as they move through their workspace. Hung in board rooms and communal office areas, artworks can help staff to think creatively, feel inspired and calm, by degrees helping generate higher productivity levels overall. Because art connects with us on an emotional level, the selection of corporate artworks often requires some research and curatorial advice. Galleries will often engage business owners in a series of discussions to determine what artworks would best complement the character and intention of their company.

“I’ve been lucky enough to be surrounded by beautiful art all my life. I find artwork in the environments in which I live, work and play incredibly uplifting and energising. I can’t imagine what it would be like not living with art as an integral part of my life.” Carol Schwartz AM, Friend & Supporter of FLG


“For a creative work place like ours art helps extend the discussion beyond just architecture alone. Our homes can lack a certain soul without art. It’s here that a house becomes a home (corny but very true). The place of work is no different. The art collection can be cohesive or can deliberately clash to encourage a question or at least a reaction from staff and clients.” Pleysier Perkins Architects, Supporters & Friends of FLG

 

Suite of Warlukurlangu Artists paintings at 101 Collins.

  • Artworks by Chloe Vallance, Raymond Carter (on book shelves), Camille Hannah, Marc Renshaw, Dion Horstmans (wall sculptures) image courtesy of Pleysier Perkins

  • Artwork by Jo Davenport, image courtesy of Loanbrix

LOOK AND LEARN

12

LOOK AND LEARN

Sometimes the best thing you can do with an artwork is to just sit down in front of it. You might not own an Escher or a Picasso, but looking at an artwork can have the same mental benefit as other forms of stimulating brain training like crosswords or spatial puzzles. Thinking conceptually, abstractly, and emotionally can help reduce stress, aid sleep and stave of illnesses such as Alzheimer’s, dementia, anxiety or depression. What a wonderful reason to sit and take in the beauty of an artwork. Art is capable of broadening our understanding of other people & cultures, increase our knowledge of this complex world and help us shape and express our identity.

Artwork by Zac Koukoravas

Artwork by Theo Faye Nangala Hudson

13

THE PLEASURE OF COLLECTING

There is nothing quite like seeing your collection grow. Not only do each of them speak to something unique and timely about your life, the act of hunting for a new work has the potential of taking you on a pleasurable journey through galleries, artists’ studios, fairs, markets and action houses. You can follow the artists’ journeys along their career paths knowing you have been a part of their support network. As each newly acquired treasure enters your space a new story unfolds.

“Living with art is a totally enriching experience full of beauty, challenge, insight and wonder. There are few material possessions that keep on giving throughout your lifetime the way art does. You don’t need to be an expert or an authority to enjoy art, just the enthusiasm to take the plunge. The reward is endless.” Charles Justin, Supporter & Friend of FLG


“As the collection grows, curated or as an informal assemblage, a layered narrative develops between the pieces which enriches the overall experience of having a collection.

The solidity and weight of the Greg Johns swivelling steel mandala has a balance, softness and movement that resonates with the dreamlike, diaphanous quality of Agneta Ekholm’s work above. composure and balance.

Zac Koukoravas dark compressed two dimensional study encapsulates the characteristics and qualities of the various sculpture pieces strategically placed around the home.

The ordered black wire sculpture of Dion Horstmans and the folded steel sculpture in sunburnt ochre by Piers Buxton are in the garden terrace.” AdeB, Supporter & Friend of FLG

Artwork by Zac Koukoravas

 

Artworks by Greg Johns and Agneta Ekholm

 

Artwork by Dion Horstmans & Piers Buxton

Artworks by Andrew Christofides (hall), Jacob Leary (hall), Paul Snell (hall), Lara Merret (lounge), Gregor Kregar (lounge). Image courtesy of Justin Arts House Museum, Apartment Detail. Photo: Andrew Wuttke

14

THE ART OF GIVING

Giving a loved one an original artwork – to commemorate a wedding, a significant birthday or perhaps just because – is such a distinct way of telling them how special they are to you. Art is intimate and enduring, and to select something you know they will love for years to come is a rewarding feeling. Maybe they have been following the career of a particular artist for some time, or you think the work reflects a theme or subject you know will resonate with them. These are great places to start when looking for an artwork for someone. It can, however, be a tricky process if you’re not entirely certain they will like the work. Make a time to go to some galleries with them first, watch what they respond to, talk to them about what they like about a particular artwork or artist’s practice before taking the plunge. And if you’re still not sure, a gift certificate can be a good option too.

“My first art purchase was really about love. I had met a girl and fallen in love, and after a whirlwind long distance romance I moved to Melbourne to be with her. We had bonded over Michael Leunig poems, as you did in the late 90s, and a week after my arrival in Melbourne she presented me with a birthday present - a beautiful, fun, large Leunig print called “Leap of Faith”.

That was the beginning of my art journey. We regularly visited galleries in Melbourne and checked out what was happening. I’d sometimes spend my lunchtime sitting in one of the main galleries of the newly- opened NGV. We slowly started buying more pieces, mainly small, affordable prints, and have since been lucky enough to buy more one- off original pieces.” Dave Coggin, Supporter & Friend of FLG

 

“I commissioned an original work by the wonderful watercolourist and print maker, the late Juli Haas, for my sister’s 40th birthday surprise party. It was a surprise and all the family contributed to the gift. The look on my sister’s face as she opened her special present was heart- warming. The artwork now features in pride of place in her home.” Claire Harris, Director FLG


“Like those of us who like to surround themselves with music, living with beautiful art feels like such a gorgeous indulgence - a really personal thing. Some have an investor’s eye; some just love what they love. That’s me really. I only give art to people I know really well. Partly because I can visit it and live with it vicariously!” Anne Austin, Friend & Support of FLG

15

ART AND SOUL

Artwork by Caroline Rannersberger

Just like the clothes and jewellery with which we choose to adorn ourselves, or those well-loved books sitting on our bookshelves, artworks also serve as an affirming reminder of who we are and what is important to us. Perhaps an image reminds you of the street you grew up in, a special holiday location, or an attitude or cultural position with which you are aligned. Having images within your space that remind you of where you come from, or what is important to you, can enhance your sense of well-being and add to a feeling of overall happiness.

’They take me to a specific time and place and as such, they are a very personal and comforting record and proof of ‘life’ and I wouldn’t be without them.’’ Graeme Bell, Friend of FLG

Artwork by William Breen, a special commissioned painting of the client’s childhood street in Melbourne.

16

MY PICTURES OF YOU

Our smart phones have really become small, mobile photo albums, housing thumbnail after thumbnail of loved ones and friends. Sometimes we print them up and frame them, but often we don’t. While formal portraiture might seem like a thing of the past – think Artist Claire Bridge with a commissioned portrait. dusty corridors and stuffy ancestors – they are actually still very relevant to today’s world. Rather than printing up a happy snap, or booking in an intimidating family photo shoot with a glitzy studio who will ultimately own all your images, the commissioning of a painted portrait is a far more intimate and personal memory. Through a few informal sittings a perceptive artist will capture the true inner beauty of your loved one.

17

HOME IS WHERE
THE ART IS

How lovely it is to come home - to shut the door, kick of the shoes and slip back into your own private world. The outside buzz fades away and the narrative of our own life is reinstated. It is within these domestic settings that we are most often at ease, where we house and keep safe those things most dear to us, Josh Robbins commission piece where we sleep and dream and reflect. In these environments artworks can operate like talismans, strengthening and focusing our passions and aspirations. They advocate our pleasures, daydreams, plans and relationships. Like old friends or a favourite piece of music, artworks energise a room and transform it from four walls into a haven.

this is it
this is the place
said the purple dove
to his purple love
come hither now
and share a feather now
forever now
we can rest here
this is the place to nest dear
with our familiar near
our happy hunting’s here
we will build and build and build
until it’s filled and filled and filled
with grass and fruit and down
and we’re warm from hearth and flume
and gown and our chesty thump, thump,
thump is our bestie sound, sound, sound.